Queen Mary partners with Health Education England to launch new medical degree pilot project

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Queen Mary student learning clinical skills

The new program aims to give students wishing to pursue a medical degree more flexibility in the way they study and a greater choice of places where the University can provide hands-on learning opportunities to complete their training.

The program will be a blend of face-to-face, online and digital learning to develop theoretical and practical knowledge and skills.

This follows the mixed-mode nursing and midwifery study programs that were introduced by Health Education England in July 2020 and June 2021 respectively.

It is hoped that the mixed-mode degree will help attract medical students from more diverse backgrounds, including those from ethnic minorities, or areas where few attend university as well as mature students.

Professor Anthony Warrens, Dean of Education at Queen Mary’s School of Medicine and Dentistry led the application for this successful grant which will see Queen Mary receive £ 250,000 to support the delivery of the new pilot.

Professor Liz Hughes, Deputy Medical Director of Health Education England, said: “We hope this pilot will be able to lay the groundwork for launching the program with universities across England, opening up the possibility for many more potential students to apply for medical degrees.

“A more flexible approach to learning is essential to develop a workforce suited to the demands of a 21st century health and care service and will ensure that a larger pool of talent will be able to capture the opportunities to join the medical profession. “

Dr Vidushi Golash, Registrar of Ophthalmology at Frimley Park Hospital and Principal Investigator to the Director of Education and Quality at Health Education England, said: “This is the first medical degree specifically created with digital and technological tools, enabling truly flexible, blended and stimulating learning. Exciting advances in the way we learn medicine and support students, like this medical degree blended learning, contribute to the growth of a diverse and digital workforce for our increasingly complex NHS. ”

Professor Anthony Warrens, Dean of Education at Queen Mary’s School of Medicine and Dentistry, said: “We are delighted to be able to further develop a high quality blended learning course in medicine. This is very much in line with our Queen Mary values ​​of inclusion and broadening participation, areas in which we are already leaders among UK medical schools. We have already developed a large amount of mixed-mode learning, but this will give us the opportunity to step up a gear and provide medical training, of the same level as the more conventional degree, to a much larger sample. of our community. “

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